There has been a long simmering debate over cursive. The Education Establishment doesn't want it, so we are seeing less and less of cursive.

Common Core downplayed phonics and tried to drop cursive. There you have two of the reasons that Common Core is widely reviled.

 Truth is, a good case can be made for cursive, especially in the early years of schooling. It helps children learn to read. It helps children learn to make sense of language. Cursive makes children smarter because you have to be precise.

 Don't get sidetracked by thinking that "cursive" means a fancy Spencerian script. Cursive just means the letters are connected and flowing. As the years go by, every person's early cursive becomes a little sloppier. That's what we call handwriting.

 The opposite of cursive is block letters, unconnected and not very pretty. Everybody signature looks the same. 

 This article lists eight reasons why cursive is  beneficial.

http://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2016/12/why_the_education_e...

Why the Education Establishment Hates Cursive, on American Thinker, with over 600 comments that reveal some of the pros and cons

Views: 82

Comment

You need to be a member of School Leadership 2.0 to add comments!

Join School Leadership 2.0

FOLLOW SL 2.0

JOIN SL 2.0

SUBSCRIBE TO

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP 2.0

School Leadership 2.0 is the premier virtual learning community for school leaders from around the globe.  Our community is a subscription based paid service ($19.95/year or only $1.99 per month for a trial membership)  which will provide school leaders with outstanding resources. Learn more about membership to this service by clicking one our links below.

 

Click HERE to subscribe as an individual.

 

Click HERE to learn about group membership (i.e. association, leadership teams)

CREATE AN EMPLOYER PROFILE AND GET JOB ALERTS AT 

SCHOOLLEADERSHIPJOBS.COM

SCHOOL LEADERSHIP 2.0 EVENTS

Amazon/SL 2.0 Book Store

School Leadership 2.0

© 2020   Created by William Brennan and Michael Keany   Powered by

Badges  |  Report an Issue  |  Terms of Service