What is the most common single reason why teachers do not get tenure?

The Dim Bulb

The Occasional Musings of an Educator

by Michael Keany

#23 - March 11, 2023

The brain is capable of performing 10 quadrillion (that’s 10 to the 16th) “calculations,” or synaptic events, per second using only about 15 watts of power. At this rate, a computer as powerful as the human brain would require 1 gigawatt of power. Maybe a dim bulb isn't really as dim as it seems.

The photo at the left is the  Livermore Centennial bulb, the world's longest-burning electric bulb

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What is the most common single reason why teachers do not get tenure? 

In the United States, tenure for K-12 teachers refers to a system of job security that is typically granted after a probationary period of three to five years. The specific reasons why a teacher may not receive tenure can vary depending on the school district and state, as well as the individual circumstances of each case. However, a common reason why teachers may not receive tenure is inadequate performance.

According to a survey conducted by the National Council on Teacher Quality (NCTQ) in 2018, the most commonly cited reason why teachers do not receive tenure is inadequate performance. The survey found that approximately 90 percent of surveyed school district personnel directors cited "unsatisfactory teacher performance" as a reason for denying tenure to teachers.

Other reasons cited for denying tenure included "insufficient improvement" (68 percent), "poor classroom management" (61 percent), "poor student discipline" (60 percent), and "failure to meet professional standards" (59 percent).

It is important to note that the specific reasons why teachers may not receive tenure can vary depending on the individual circumstances of each case, and that tenure decisions are typically made by school district administrators in accordance with state and local policies and regulations.

References:

National Council on Teacher Quality. (2018). 2018 State Teacher Policy Yearbook: Tenure and Dismissal. Retrieved from https://www.nctq.org/yearbook/home/Tenure-and-Dismissal-31.

National Education Association. (2019). Understanding Tenure. Retrieved from https://www.nea.org/advocating-for-change/new-from-nea/understandin....

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