Dual Language in Early Education Best for Youngest ELLs, Report Says

Young English-language learners who are still developing oral and literacy skills in their home languages benefit most in early-childhood programs that regularly expose them to both languages.

That's one of several major takeaways in a new federally funded analysis of the large, and growing, population of dual-language learners, ranging from birth to 5, already enrolled in, or headed for, early-childhood-education programs.

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This is not news to anyone who has successfully taught bilingual students or raised bilingual children. But while this may be called a "bilingual" approach, the L1 at-home teaching is more likely "immersion" where the school attempts to equalize between the two. It is also, why the L1 language learned through immersion at home is often the dominant language (because of the immersion). Which means... there needs to be a greater level of English immersion in schools since the home is taking very good care of their end.

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